One Year of Service Makes a Lifetime of Difference

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TSheets employees donate 1,000+ volunteer hours, $79K to local causes. Here’s why they make volunteering a priority.

Learn more about our four-legged employee.

Here at TSheets, aside from service dogs and golfing in costume, there are few things we love more than giving back to our communities. It’s been part of our company’s traditions, long before we joined the Intuit family. Thanks to Intuit’s generous We Care & Give Back (WCGB) program, which gives employees 32 hours of PTO for volunteering each year and matches 100 percent of donations made to any 501(c)3 nonprofit an employee supports (up to $5,000), that passion for community giving has only grown.

You might remember a blog we wrote last September about our very first Week of Service. While Intuit employees are encouraged to get involved throughout the year, there’s an extra push during the summer, when Intuit sites bring in a plethora of opportunities for volunteering and donating money or goods. In one week, employees at TSheets’ Boise headquarters volunteered 581 hours of time, supported 15 local nonprofits, and donated over $6,000.

Now that TSheets has been a part of Intuit for a year, we just had to look back at 2018 and celebrate the incredible impact our team has made.

 

  • 1,000+ hours donated

  • $78,938 donated to nonprofits (includes Intuit match)

  • 65% participation throughout the company

 

Part of that celebration includes taking a closer look at some of our top donors, including TSheets’ No. 1 volunteer, Keith Gongora, who logged 74 hours of volunteer time in 2018.

 

Keith takes his cause courtside

Keith, his wife, Adri, and their three kiddos, Ryan (13), Noah (8), and Olivia (5), hail from the heart of Chicago, Illinois. They relocated to Idaho two years ago, and Keith has been a product designer at TSheets for the last year. He’s currently transitioning from our mobile team to our mission team, where he’ll be helping out to make our TSheets-QuickBooks integration smoother than ever.

Outside of work, Keith loves mentoring kids, both through his church and a community basketball group called T3 Sports. He coaches second and third graders and assists with a group of sixth and seventh graders. There, he’s able to apply the skills he learned himself out on the court, having played ball all through high school and college.

 

Caring for kids and keeping it real

Over the year, Keith logged 74 hours of volunteer time, which he says doesn’t tell the full story. “I didn’t even record all my hours for T3,” he laughs.

As for what he does for T3, Keith says it’s a combination of teaching teamwork and communication. “One of the big focal points I’ve taught since the very beginning is just communicating with each other and treating each other with respect. As well as having this family mentality,” he says.

Keith teaches his players to “praise up” — an attitude anyone can benefit from. “There’s never any putting anyone down,” he says. “Everyone is just encouraging. A player can miss five straight shots. They can be horrible shots — air balls, over the backboard, whatever — and the kids will say ‘keep shooting.’ It’s really cool to see that at 8, 9 years old.”

Keith’s coaching has led the team to great success. So far, they’ve won three out of their last five tournaments, and Keith says he’s seen the kids grow leaps and bounds in development and maturity as well.

As a youth leader at Rock Harbor Church, Keith also gets plenty of volunteer time in throughout the week, which, in this case, made up around 80 percent of his logged hours. His favorite event this year was an outdoor camp near McCall, Idaho, for sixth through eighth graders. He describes the event as a chance to worship but also as an opportunity to branch out and build relationships with peers and mentors.

“It’s really cool to see the kids grow and feel comfortable in their own skin,” he says. Doing so has allowed him to help kids through struggles like depression or being bullied. When asked what advice he might give to those looking to serve more of a mentoring role with children, he had this to say:

“It’s being honest and there for them. If you reach out and consistently ask about their wellbeing, they know you care for them. They begin to open up. And something I personally do is let them know that I’m not perfect and make mistakes. If I’ve gone through a similar situation, I will tell them the story, even if I didn’t act accordingly.”

 

Anyone can volunteer — even you

“We always have time [to volunteer],” Keith says. “It’s kind of funny. I hear a lot of people say ‘I don’t have time,’ but we always have time for video games and binge-watching Netflix and stuff.”

Keith says his Chicago roots might play a role in his affinity for community giving and his love for working with kids. “A lot of my friends grew up without father figures or close-knit families,” he says. “Sometimes a kid just needs a helping hand or someone to acknowledge them.”

Keith agrees that, at times, the biggest hurdle is getting over what could be described simply as selfishness — that dismissive voice that tells us it’s fine to only worry about ourselves. But giving in to that urge isn’t just damaging to our communities. In an odd sort of irony, it’s self-sabotaging as well, since giving back so often yields feelings of happiness that would otherwise be missed. “You’ll see joy at the end of the day for your efforts,” says Keith. “Especially when you see the smiles and the gratitude associated with it.”