Mom-preneurs put in 100-hour weeks—and still feel stressed on Mother’s Day

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We’re in the midst of National Small Business Week, and over the years, we’ve learned that business owners wake up way too early, work weekends, and don’t vacation nearly enough.

But if you can believe it, there’s an even tougher job out there—a job that offers no financial or medical benefits, promotes a grueling work schedule, and pays next to nothing.  

We’re talking about parenthood.

According to a recent survey* conducted by TSheets by QuickBooks, 80% of U.S. business owners are also parents. One in 3 has at least two kids under the age of 18 living in their household, and the majority of those parent-preneurs spend 10 or more hours on parental responsibilities alone each week.

But, hey, it’s May, so let’s talk about moms.

82% of women who own businesses are also moms. Two in 5 of these women say they spend at least 60 hours on parental responsibilities each week—and that’s on top of their already grueling 40-hour workweek.

Unsurprisingly, these mom-preneurs all say they struggle with a lack of work-life balance, unsuccessful time management, and some seriously long hours. 58% of them admit that work commitments have caused them to miss out on or neglect important family time. On the flip side, 46% say they’ve missed out on important (and potentially lucrative) business opportunities due to family obligations. In either case, the majority of moms agree that both work and family often come between them and that oh-so-important “me time.”

In short, working moms are constantly walking a precarious tightrope between spending time with their family and running a successful business—and they’re amazing at it! 45% of people who own a business point to their mom as the person who inspires them most. And 19% say they most often turn to their mom for both business and personal advice (over their dad or their spouse). Why? Because moms got it goin’ on!

And yet, 22% of moms say their children have, at some point, completely forgotten about Mother’s Day. 20% say they have purposefully postponed their own Mother’s Day celebration to focus on work, and another 20% say they have spent the day arguing with family rather than being showered with flowers and homemade breakfast.

It’s no wonder over 46% of working moms say they feel more stressed on Mother’s Day than they do on a usual Sunday.

Listen up, folks. If you’ve taken anything from this blog post, it should be this: Mom’s are putting in 100-hour weeks between running a business and living that #momlife. They often have to make some seriously hard decisions when it comes to balancing their work and personal time—often sacrificing time to themselves. And while Mother’s Day should serve as a celebration and acknowledgment of all that hard work, most moms end up feeling stressed, hurt, or forgotten.

The buck stops here.

If you’re a mom, have a mom, or know a mom, it’s time to celebrate! Whether you’re related or not, it’s time to tell that mom how much she means to you, how much she inspires you, and how much you appreciate her neverending hard work.

Want to get her a gift? According to the TSheets survey, 1 in 5 typically spends about $20 on a Mother’s Day gift. Another 1 in 5 spends closer to $100, and some overachieving survey respondents admitted to spending $1,000 or more to celebrate the moms in their life.

But the best gift of all, according to these working moms, is priceless: Just a few hours to themselves.

 

*Methodology: TSheets by QuickBooks commissioned Pollfish to survey 1,000 business owners and prospective business owners who also have children or intend to have children, and who have internet access and were rewarded for their participation. The poll was conducted in April 2019, with a 95% confidence level and a margin of error of ±3 percentage points. The margin of error is larger for subgroups.
Citations: TSheets by QuickBooks welcomes the re-use of this data under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium provided the original source is cited with attribution to “TSheets by QuickBooks.