Being on Time – Is it Important?

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Is being on time important?  If so, how important?  As a company that sells a time tracking tool surely you can imagine what our answer might be, but we’re a little biased.

I just got done reading a blog post from Caroline4sumone.  In her post, Caroline writes about a situation at work where a woman known for being consistently late is hired onto a team at Caroline’s company.  Lo and behold this new employee shows up late for the very first day of work. The story is interesting but it isn’t what really got my gray matter churning.

What intrigued me were the comments that were left after Caroloine4sumone spoke about her frustration with this employee.  Here’s just a sample:

Frodo: Ah relax. being on time is overrated

highpriestess: If they are 5mins late then it’s ok but if they are an hour late and make a habit of it then it’s uncalled for.

Paul: There is nothing wrong with being late the odd time but if it is consistent then it is a problem. And it is usually the people who are consistently late that have poor productivity. Also it pisses off the other team members who feel they have managed to get in on time and have to pick up the slack. I would work with them to improve their time keeping but ultimately I would let them go if it did not improve.

Now, as far as the eagle flies, in my book output is much more important than input, but does this really matter?  Does it matter any more or less if said employee is hourly rather than salary?

If not, when does it start to matter?  How often can an employee be tardy until it’s no longer a good business decision to keep them around?

What do you think?

Here’s a fun calculation you can do.  Share your answers by leaving a comment.

L/60 x R x F = WC x 52 = YC/12 = MC

L = Average number of minutes an employee is late
R = Employee’s hourly pay rate
F = Avg. number of days per week employee is late
WC = Weekly Cost
MC = Monthly Cost
YC = Yearly Cost

*Please do not confuse this with Einstein’s theory of productivity, as that requires MC to be squared.  Squaring the TSheets theory of Being on Timeitivity could lead to the cataclysmic collapse of the sun.  DO NOT TRY AT HOME!

1 Comment

  1. […] becoming apparent. As employees began to see how their contributions directly impacted the result, showing up to work on time became more important, as well as performing their best and holding their fellow workers […]

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